equalopportunityBloomberg reports that South African women have benefited more than men from changes in the labour market and education opportunities since the end of apartheid.  

This has been shown by a study published by the United Nations University.  Jacqueline Mosomi, a researcher at the University of Cape Town (UCT), explained in the study that the changes reflected the unraveling of the racist societal structure put in place during decades of institutional segregation that began in 1948 and limited the ability of women to travel to and live in cities.  They also demonstrated the positive impact of minimum wages and affirmative action laws that promoted both racial and gender diversity in the workplace.  While in 1993, a year before the end of apartheid, women in low-paying jobs such as domestic work or unskilled farm labour were paid 21% less than men in equivalent positions, the wage gap narrowed to 7% in 2014.  Across the workforce, the proportion of women with tertiary education doubled to 20% in 2015 from 10% in 1993, compared with a more modest rise to 15% from 11% for men.  “The post-apartheid government has been successful in improving the human-capital characteristics of women.  This has led to an increasing number of women in high-skilled occupations,” Mosomi observed.


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