amcu thumb medium80 81BusinessLive reports that questions about whether the government has done enough to acknowledge its central role in the 2012 Marikana massacre and make amends to the victims and their families took centre stage on Monday as nine years were marked since the atrocity.

At least 34 mineworkers who were striking over wages in Rustenburg, North West, were gunned down by police and 78 were injured. The government has been accused of protecting and colluding with mine owner Lonmin, leaving victims out in the cold and with no convictions for the police who killed the workers. Speaking during the hybrid Marikana massacre commemoration, Association of Mineworkers and Construction Union (Amcu) president Joseph Mathunjwa said the victims of the massacre had been abandoned by their government. But police minister Bheki Cele denied this and said the government has paid R176m to the victims’ families. Yet, the legal representative of the injured and arrested mineworkers, advocate Dali Mpofu, dismissed Cele’s response as “deceptive” and said the money was too little for the hundreds of affected workers. The mineworkers have been paid between R300,000 and R400,000. Lonmin sold the mine to Sibanye-Stillwater in 2019, with the new owners and President Cyril Ramaphosa, who was a Lonmin director and a shareholder at the time, now facing a lawsuit from the mineworkers. Mpofu said a group of workers had set aside R1m of their compensation money for the lawsuit. The legal teams of all those affected by the massacre agreed to take on Sibanye and Ramaphosa and they have approached the North West High Court.


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